[Review] Taurus G2C 9mm

The Taurus G2C is something of a phenomenon. Sales are greater than expected, which surprises a few people. Taurus is not the company it was, even 10 years ago. It used to be that if you bought a Taurus (especially a semi-auto), some fellow shooter might hand you a quarter and say “flip it – there’s the same chance of it coming up heads as of you getting a good pistol”, or words to that effect.

Does Taurus still have its share of returns to customer service? Sure. What firearm manufacturer doesn’t?

The thing is, the number of returns have shrunk some. Under new management, Taurus is really trying to clean up its act where quality control is concerned. I am not a Taurus fanboy, nor do I work for them – I’ve had my share of returns to Miami (even one there now as of this date). I want to offer the notion that the company is trying to do a better job. They certainly are into innovation where firearm development is concerned. Some samples might be the Curve .380, the Spectrum .380 (I own one), and the snub-nose .38 Special the View with its clear side panel. Perhaps none of these have created such an impact on the shooting world as Taurus’s latest product (as of this writing), the TX22 semiauto .22 LR pistol. This gun, to glance at it quickly, could be mistaken for a 9mm compact but is in fact a full-size .22. The magazine holds 16 rounds and the gun has all the earmarks of a carry weapon. That’s not by accident – Taurus is positioning this gun in the marketplace as a training gun, a .22 that behaves like your centerfire model. It is quite innovative, from that standpoint.

Taurus TX22
Taurus TX22

The reason I mention these is to show that Taurus is evidently trying to think out of the box and to regain what it lost over the years of indifferent quality control and customer service. The G2C is a great example of that.

History Of The G2C

G2C Slide Logo

Taurus introduced the Millenium series of pistols in 2005. Some of the models of guns in this series include the PT-111, PT-132, PT-140 and PT-145, all in both Standard and Pro formats. These guns were striker-fired, short-recoil operated and were designed to be fired double-action only or single/double action. They were brought out to compete in the concealed carry market and for law enforcement backup purposes. In 2013, the G2 guns were unveiled. These were in caliber 9mm and .40 S&W.

Taurus G2C Model Number

The PT-111 G2A was the 9mm version and featured rough stippling on the grip, a port-side safety lever, single action with double-strike capability action, “memory pads” molded into the frame, an adjustable-rear three-dot sight system and a Glock-style pull-down-lever takedown system. Here are some quick vital statistics:

Caliber 9mm +P
Barrel Length 3.25 inches
Height 5 inches
Width 1.2 inches
Weight 22 oz.
Frame Polymer
Slide Stainless steel
Capacity 12 rounds, 2 magazines included with finger extensions
Safeties Striker block, trigger safety, manual safety, loaded chamber indicator

underside of slide of Taurus G2C

Before there was the G2C, there was the PT-111 Millenium Pro. I owned two of these. They were great pistols, but the G2C is a definite improvement. Two main differences between the PT-111 Pro and the G2C are the stippled grip of the G2C and the lack of the Taurus key-lock security system. This alone caused many to buy this gun over the older one. The security system was, to put it politely, not well liked. So, Taurus omitted it from the G2C. With four other safeties, maybe they figured they didn’t need it. It did perform a different function, however…its purpose was to make sure the gun couldn’t fire if it was locked. I’ve known of a few folks who don’t have a gun safe who would keep their Taurus (or Smith and Wesson revolver, for that matter) semi-auto locked to keep it safe. Anyway, the new one doesn’t have it and I’m glad.

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Hits And Misses

Let’s talk, right up front, about what I like and don’t like about my G2C. Obviously I like it enough to keep it – I carry it regularly – but there are a few things I’d change if I could.

Hits

Size and Capacity. It is roughly the size of a Glock 27 but holds two more rounds.

Grip Texture. I truly love the new stippling treatment that the grip frame received. I am one to stipple grips – I like a very rough surface that buries itself in your hand while shooting. I might even get my soldering iron out and put my stippling job on top of the one Taurus did.

Tactile Loaded Chamber Indicator (LCI). Some don’t like these, but I do. There’s one on my Springfield XDM, a chamber flag just like on the G2C. I can run my finger over the barrel hood to see if the chamber is loaded, something I have done on more than one occasion, without having to look down at the gun. I like this system better than the “peek-holes” that some guns utilize.

Tactile Loaded Chamber Indicator (LCI)
Tactile Loaded Chamber Indicator (LCI)

Double-Strike Capability. Even though it’s a single-action pistol, it uses an extra double-strike sear so that if the primer doesn’t go off the first time, you can have another crack at it before having to go to “tap-rack-bang”. I’ve used this feature a lot, mostly on some of my reloads where I may not get the primer fully seated. They usually always go off on the second pull. A side note: this is why you don’t carry reloads as your self-defense ammo. I usually carry Remington Golden Sabers or Hornady Critical Defense rounds. (For a look at some of the best 9mm self-defense ammo, look here).

Double Sears

Adjustable Rear Sight. OK, so it’s not the most sturdy sight out there but at least you can adjust it for windage and elevation for different loads. I’ve had these same sights on other Taurus guns I’ve owned and they’ve never failed me.

Rear sight adjustment screws: elevation (L); windage (R)
Rear sight adjustment screws: elevation (L); windage (R)
Rear sight picture with white dots
Rear sight picture with white dots
Taurus G2C Front sight with white dot (original is white; I painted this one to make it easier on my aging eyes)
Taurus G2C Front sight with white dot (original is white; I painted this one to make it easier on my aging eyes)

Polished Feed Ramp. The feed ramp is polished, maybe not to Springfield Armory standards, but it sure looks better than feed ramps I’ve had on older Taurus pistols. I’ve had no feed issues with factory ammo, although I have had to adjust some of my reloads for reliable functioning.

Taurus G2C Feed Ramp

(This photo really doesn’t show just how shiny the ramp is. It really is better than the older ones.
I will polish it some more when I get time – I just got the gun not long ago).

Rail Slot. The gun has a Picatinny rail slot, so you can mount your lights or lasers.

Taurus G2C Rail Slot

12-Round Magazine. It comes with two, with witness holes. They have both proven to be reliable.

Taurus G2C Magazine

Misses

Here are a few things that I feel Taurus could improve on:

Recoil Spring & Guide. The captured recoil spring is mounted on a polymer guide rod. There have been several cases of the spring slipping over the end of the rod, tying the gun up. Lakeline LLC sells a lot of replacement stainless steel guide rods and springs because of this. Taurus could fix this by making the rod out of metal, not plastic. I’d pay whatever extra the gun would cost to get this changed.

Taurus G2C Recoil Spring

Trigger. The trigger could be improved. There is a definite “catch” after you cycle the slide and pull the trigger, as the trigger blade safety moves out of the way. When I first got mine, it was so pronounced that I thought something was wrong as it didn’t fire when it “clicked”. Found out later that the click was related to the trigger blade safety. It seems that the trigger and safety blade’s “trigger-nometry” could be better. This causes the safety to hang up unless you pull the trigger straight back. Some home remedies I’ve read about or seen on YouTube include filing a bit off the hook at the end of the blade or even putting heat shrink tubing over the trigger and the blade and making them “one” by shrinking the tubing over both. I can’t imagine these fixes are smiled upon in Miami…I don’t know about voiding warranties, but why push it? Mine is coming along fine…just pull the trigger correctly and you shouldn’t have a problem. It is working itself out as I put more rounds downrange.

Rear Sight. OK, I know I mentioned the adjustable rear sight above. But, some people worry that this particular adjustable sight on a carry gun, can be fragile so they replace the factory sight with a fixed or drift-adjustable rear. Night sights are available, again from Lakeline LLC. A fiber optic front is another option. Actually, there are many aftermarket sight solutions for this gun, but if you want a pistol red dot you might have to visit a gun smith.

That’s all. So, for me, the hits outweigh the misses. Some YouTube cowboys seem to want to bemoan this and wail about that where this gun is concerned and then conclude that it isn’t a Sig P365. Guess what…you’re right! It ISN’T a P365, and is not meant to be. In case they may have forgotten, when the P365 first came out, it had its share of troubles. Nothing is perfect. Am I knocking the P365? Heck, no – I’d love to have one but I can’t afford one. You can literally buy two G2Cs for the price of one P365 (see below). Speaking of that great 9mm, let’s look at a quick comparison between the two…

How Does It Compare In Its Segment

MSRP: Sig: $599 Taurus: $332.82 (stainless)
Real-World Price: Sig: $529 Taurus: $213.00 (or less; I’ve seen it as low as $155)

Taurus G2C vs Sig P365
Sig P365 vs Taurus G2C (right)

Screen capture: handgunhero.com

I singled the P365 out for special treatment because it seems to be the “wonderchild” of subcompact 9s right now. Speaking of comparisons, I’ll put the G2C’s specs next to those of several other popular carry 9mms. Hopefully this may help if you’re trying to decide between two or more guns.

Subcompact 9mm Comparison Chart (Measurements Are In Inches/Ounces)

 G2CGlock 43Glock 26 G4Bersa TPRCFN FNS-9C
Length6.256.266.56.56.7
Height54.254.84.755.2
Width1.21.021.21.451.35
Weight2218222523
Barrel3.253.423.423.253.6
Capacity2-12 round2-6 round3-10 round2-13 round2-12 round and 1-17 round or 3-10 round
Ruger EC9S/LC9S ProS&W M&P Shield M 2.0Mossberg MC1sc
Length66.16.25
Height4.54.64.3
Width0.90.951
Weight17.218.319
Barrel3.123.13.4
Capacity1-7 round (9
round, extra cost)
1 each 7/8
round
1-6 and 1-7 round

(For a more complete breakdown of some of the best 9mm pistols overall, look here. Check this out for some great single-stack subcompact 9mm pistols).

What I didn’t show in the chart are prices. They vary so much, depending on where and how you buy (new or used on Gunbroker.com) I thought it wise to not try to track down real-world prices. I listed the MSRP above for the P365 and the G2C but that was only for comparison. I believe the closest in real-world pricing to the Taurus would be the Ruger – I own one of those as well. It is a true pocket pistol, and is an excellent buy. But…it’s a single stack with less capacity, no adjustable sights, no tactile LCI, etc. when compared to the G2C. I like them both but tend to carry the Taurus in its Concealment Express IWB holster. It is truly comfortable. I wrote a review about the best concealed carry holsters, which gets updated regularly.

OK…Which One Gives The G2C The Best Run For Its Money?

I have often thought about what gun may be the main competitor of the G2C, as I stated above when comparing it to the P365. Let’s be blunt – if you can afford a P365, you probably won’t buy a G2C. But…for the money, I don’t think you can beat it. Its newest threat in terms of sales just might be the new kid on the block, the new Mossberg MC1sc. The full MSRP on this pistol is $425, with the real-world price considerably less. The feature set that the Mossberg boasts is pretty extensive…a custom-style flat trigger with safety blade, a slide rear plate that comes off easily to allow the Glock-style striker to be cleaned, forward serrations on the slide, enhanced ergonomics, a really smooth trigger pull of between 5-6 pounds, and clear flush-fit and extended magazines. Mossberg designed this gun after doing very extensive market research, so it tends to have a lot of features that meet the requirements of desired features on a concealed carry gun. This gun is going to be a good seller (once it’s past its teething pains, if it has any) I would imagine. But, again, its dimensions are not that much different than the G2C’s and you get the added capacity that two 12-round magazines give you over the 6 and 7 rounders that come with the Mossberg. Anyway, the comparisons are just to help if you need a quick reference. For more exact information, check the manufacturer’s web site.

Reliability Vs. Price

As long as a gun does what it’s supposed to, that’s what matters with me. And so far, the G2C has done what it is supposed to. If you do a quick video review survey, there seem to be more videos on YouTube praising the G2C than bashing it. A whole lot of video makers/shooters think that this gun is one of the best you could carry to protect yourself. I tend to agree. It has become my favorite carry gun.

Easy To Hide

Here is a photo of my rather-large self with the gun in a Concealment Express IWB Kydex holster.

Taurus G2C in IWB Holster

With this holster, sometimes I forget there’s a gun there…it’s that comfortable. Under a light jacket or hoodie there is literally no printing. This gun hides very well, and the holster pulls the grip in towards the body. The finger extension magazines don’t cause the gun to print, at least in my experience.

Accuracy

The gun is suitably accurate for its purpose. I tested it at 7 and 15 yards with factory FMJ practice ammo (Tula and Winchester White Box 115 grain) and my reloads consisting of a 124-grain cast round-nose bullet over 4 grains of Long Shot. Accuracy was what you’d want in a self-defense gun…in terms of practical accuracy, I was able to put double-taps in the 4-inch center box of my homemade targets as fast as I could pull the trigger from 7 yards. That’s plenty accurate enough for me.

Here are three targets I shot. The details are as follows:

Brand:Weight/Type:Velocity:Energy:SD:ES:
Tula FMJ115 grain RN10662962451
WWB115 grain RN10622882049
My Reload126 grain cast RN9922713481

Of the two factory loads, the Winchester was marginally more accurate than the Tula, but what surprised me was my reload. It wasn’t exactly a one-hole group but it did shoot better than the other two, especially considering the extreme spread of 81. To be totally fair, I had roughly adjusted the rear sight for my load, so the other two loads aren’t centered. But, the handload was still the most accurate overall. Here are the targets:

Tula FMJ 115 Ammo on Target
Tula 115 grain FMJ – each square on the target is an inch.
Winchester White Box 115 grain FMJ on Target
Winchester White Box 115 grain FMJ
My reloads on target shot with the Taurus G2C
My reloads

I did not test self-defense ammo – I have always had excellent results with any JHP load I’ve shot through any of the Taurus PT-111 G2 Milleniums or the G2C I’ve owned. As I said above, I carry either Remington Golden Sabers or Hornady Critical Defense for self-defense, but any of the ones listed in the article on that topic should work great. Please don’t think I don’t practice with JHPs, just because I didn’t include them in the tests…I’ve just found that they are, or were, 100% reliable in the three G2/PT-111 pistols I’ve owned over the years. Here’s one thing to look out for…a lot of the time, JHP self-defense loads tend to strike a little lower on the target, depending upon bullet weight and velocity. That’s where the adjustable rear sight comes in handy – you can adjust it for your carry load – then leave it there. Don’t go back and forth with it, adjusting it for your carry load and then for your practice ammo. Set it for your serious load and let it go. In case you missed the link above, I compared several 9mm self-defense rounds in an article on that topic – it’s worth looking at. Check it out here.

Practical Accuracy, Reliability

OK…so we know that the gun is at least fairly accurate when shot two-handed, unaided by a rest, at seven and fifteen yards. Is that enough to warrant carrying it? Is it accurate enough? I’d say yes. I’ve shot some pretty expensive guns that couldn’t do as well as this $249 thumper did with my so-so factory ammo and run-of-the-mill reloads. Would I carry it? Would I worry about either its accuracy or reliability? Nope. Since all I carry for serious work are top-quality self-defense rounds, I’ve never had a reliability issue with these guns, and practical accuracy has been all that it should be. I trust the platform, as do thousands of other concealed carry practitioners (CCW insurance comparison).

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And, In The End…

To sum everything up, I trust my Taurus. Once past its wonky trigger “catch” (which has smoothed out and is almost totally gone, with a lot of shooting), I find I hit what I aim at with this gun, and do so with regularity. It does go ‘bang’ every time (with those few exceptions mentioned above that were directly related to my reloads) and I trust it. Do I trust the company? I guess I must, because I had bought a .380 Spectrum before I bought this G2C. The Taurus of old is slowly going away, being replaced by a company trying harder to have its finger on the pulse of the shooting public. It is also trying harder with quality control and customer service.

This is a company that learns from its actions…they had modified their “no-questions-asked” lifetime repair policy to a one-year arrangement for guns made after a certain date. I then read recently (got an email from them, actually) that they are reinstating their lifetime warranty (albeit only to the original purchaser), probably after being bombarded with emails requesting the change back from one year to lifetime. The point is, they listened. Is this company perfect? Heck no. They still have a ways to go before gaining the respect of many shooters who had, once upon a time, bought a Taurus only to have to send it back to that black hole that was Customer Service. At least they’re trying harder now.

The G2C will surely do the job it was designed for, if fed good-quality ammo and kept clean and lubed. Would I take a P365 if someone gave it to me? Sure – I’m not an idiot. But, not having connections with Sig Sauer or any other manufacturer, I would have to buy my own P365. I can buy two G2Cs and have exactly $101 left over for the price of one P365 at MSRP for both guns. I sure think you could do worse than carry one of these. If you’re worried about the recoil spring guide, replace it for $28.95 with one from Lakeline LLC. Want night sights? $69.95. Want a different trigger? Galloway Precision sells a short stroke trigger for $24. With its Picatinny slot, you can add a laser sight. The point is that you can make this gun whatever you want it be for not a whole lot of money. Is it worth it? I think so. This is the third G2 I’ve owned, counting the two PT-11 G2s I bought…that’s one more than the two Smith and Wesson SD9VEs I owned, which says something. My gun budget is pretty tight, so I have to have guns that work as expected but don’t cost too much. The G2C does that admirably. Take a look at one next time you’re drooling over the guns at your favorite gun store-you might be pleasantly surprised. Let me know what you think, below.

Mike
Written by Mike

Mike has been a shooter, bullet caster and reloader for over 40 years. Never one to be satisfied with the status quo, he is often found at his reloading bench concocting yet another load. With a target range in his backyard and after 40 years of shooting, his knowledge of firearms and reloading is fairly extensive. He is married, with four sons and daughters-law and 8-and-counting grandkids.

100 thoughts on “[Review] Taurus G2C 9mm”

  1. I have to agree. At least for the time being. I have yet to take delivery of my new G2C. It was perfect budget wise and after all the positive and some negative reviews on YouTube, it gave me a good perspective and so I went and bought one. Nice article and I appreciate your thoroughness. After some time with this wonder 9, I will probably pick up the TX 22. It reminds me of my Steyr M9A1 at least in aesthetics.

    Reply
    • Francis, I don’t think you can go wrong with the G2C. I did forget to mention that if you are looking for a single-stack version, there’s the G2S – not sure if that matters to you. The TX 22 looks really interesting, as well. Thanks for the comments!

      Reply
    • I sure like my GSG/ATI 1911-22 for under $225 too. Lots of different finish options too, and mag kits from Taylor Tactical that take the factory 10rd mag to 15 with an affordable kit and longer spring and shorter follower, and stainless butt plate replacement.

      Some parts actually are interchangeable with the real 1911, same size and weight, and it’s nice and heavy for no-recoil plinking and targets. Solid .22.

      Reply
    • When you receive this give it a breakdown with a good cleaning especially around the firing pin. Surprised how dirty it was from factory.

      Reply
      • I’m new to this. Decided to get the Taurus G2C. Is there any video or anything on how to clean this gun, like the firing pin like you suggested? Wonder why they come from the factory dirty like that?

        Reply
        • Randy, check You Tube and Full 30. There are a lot of videos that will show you how to take it down for cleaning. Some folks take the firing pin out, others just shoot some solvent in the channel. Check out a few of the videos and jump in wherever your skill set lets you. They aren’t necessarily dirty from the factory, just packed with shipping grease. Thanks for writing!

          Reply
  2. I own a Taurus G2C and I carry it every day, it is accurate and very easy to conceal. I have other weapons but I rather carry my Taurus.

    Reply
    • Nick, that seems to be the general opinion of G2C owners. I know of a few who prefer to carry their G2C over their Glock 26. That does say something! Thanks for your comment.

      Reply
  3. I’ve had 2 previous pt111 G2’s. I traded one in on a CZ75 B. The other on a Sig P365. I wanted to like the sig, but I found it be gimiky. It’s just to small. Even with the 12 round magazines. The magazines are extremely hard to load. What I find most uncomfortable is the diameter of the grip. It’s to small around. I also had 2 failure to fires in a single range session. It wasn’t the firing pin. It was the slide would go far enough to pick up a round, but not far enough to engage the striker. I was using American Eagle 124grain. I had around 600 rounds in it before it happened. All the same ammo. It was probably ammo related, but it gave me a good excuse to get rid of it. The recoil spring is pretty tight. Also had pretty severe primer drag.

    I traded it off for a new Taurus 65 357 stainless with a significant loss. I had the P365 for 2 months. 1 month to long. I regretted trading off my pt111 g2 for it.

    Luckily Taurus is now offering a rebate on the G2C. I have one on order right now. I’m getting the OD green (it’s brown) just like the pt111 g2 I got rid of. $199.00 with a $25 rebate. The P365 in my opinion is overrated. The G2C is a better overall value.

    I’m not a Taurus fanboy. I own firearms from many manufacturers. My primary carry is a CZ P01 since 2004. I was attempting to retire it with the P365. It’s still an awesome firearm, but it looks like it’s been carried for 15 years.

    Reply
    • Jeremy, first thanks for your comments- I appreciate hearing from shooters. As for the P365 being thin and not engaging the striker on slide rebound, I think Sig has had to address some issues with this gun. While it IS a Sig (’nuff said for a lot of shooters), it can be quirky. According to some, Sig even brought out its own line of ammo for short-barreled 9mms in the hopes of getting the little guy to behave better in the reliability department. (That would be the 365 Elite line of ammo). As for CZ, what can you say? Great guns!! Too bad you had to trade your 365 for a loss. At least the .357 Taurus will go “bang” every time. Taurus makes some great wheelguns, to be sure. I do think that a lot of shooters are discovering that the “cheap” $250 G2C is as reliable as the $600 P365…as I said in the article, you can buy 2 G2Cs for the price of 1 P365 and still get $101 back in change, with both at MSRP. Is the G2C a P365? Nope, not meant to be nor could it be at the price it sells for. It’s just an affordable, reliable carry gun with a 12+1 capacity. Again, thanks for your comments.

      Reply
  4. Great article written from a down to earth, real people perspective.

    I do wonder where the Kimber micro 9 was?

    Reply
    • Russell, thanks for your compliment. I do try to be real-world when I write up a gun. I’m just a country guy with a backyard range who loves handguns and likes to shoot them, then write about them. As for the Kimber, I probably should have included it in order to add a 1911-style design to the mix. Maybe I can write about it in a future article. The Kimber is a wonderful carry gun – if you have one, you are well-armed! Thanks again.

      Reply
  5. I am left with questions regarding the temperament to dirt, sand, and water. Knowing the inexpensive cost and layout of the G2C leaves me with concerns of reliability in a situation where it would be critical. I have always been a fan of Taurus revolvers and curious how far in advancement consideration this real-world scenario potential Taurus has to considered.

    Reply
    • August, I don’t know about the G2C’s reliability after being dunked in mud…I would imagine it would be as reliable as most any other similar gun after getting wet, dirty, etc. due to its manufacturing tolerances. I’m not sure if any You Tube videos exist about this situation but it might be worth a search. Thanks for the comment!

      Reply
      • James Yeager has 3 videos around this handgun in 2019. 8 or 9 in one of his weekend tactical classes. Around 8k rounds shot

        Reply
        • Peter, good point. I trust his opinion and the TFB channel in general. He tends to call it like it is. If he says they put 8K rounds downrange with the G2C, I believe him. Another testimony to its reliability. Thanks for writing!

          Reply
    • Spidero, The M85 ultralight is a great gun. It’s good to know that folks are still carrying wheelguns! Thanks for the comment!

      Reply
  6. Good article, informative, well written. Thanks. 🙂

    Am looking at a G2C right now with a $30 rebate bringing it down to $185 delivered – in dark purple with the stainless slide, 2 mags. The black slides rebate is $25. Found factory mags for $22 ea, as well. Today is 4-18-19.

    Reply
    • Vulcan (great screen name!), you can’t go wrong with that gun and accessories at those prices. Just clean it good before you shoot it and remember that the trigger will work itself out after shooting. You might want to pick up some snap caps and dry fire it. Mine had what I call the “G2C Catch” in the trigger when I first got it but it’s gone now and is one mighty fine trigger, without me spending a dime to correct it. Also, the double-strike capability really helps, for me at least. Sounds like you’ve fallen into a sweet deal! (And, as the photos above show, I have the stainless slide, too…really like the contrast. A purple frame would be really interesting!).

      Reply
      • Thanks for your reply. 🙂

        I also picked up a few Lakeline LLC parts to replace the plastic ones inside the G2c mechanism with superior stainless steel ones, and grabbed their fiber optic sight for it too! I have the Williams Fire Sight Fiber optic sights on another Taurus and love them – very bright with minimal ambient light! Not many sights available for the G2c with tritium or fiber optic, and the price was right at Lakeline at $40 for both. Not installed just yet but they might cure the “catch” you mentioned.

        Reply
        • Vulcan, I’m sure those parts will help. Lakeline seems to make very nice parts for a reasonable price. The thing is, that with the G2C, you can either leave it as is and have a really decent carry gun or invest in a guide rod/spring and maybe sights and then end up with a nicer gun. Adding a different trigger is the icing on the cake. Mine is stock, but I’ll think about at least replacing the guide rod/spring. I had a newbie shoot mine two days ago and he hit what he was aiming at – he liked it. Thanks again for your comments on your personal experience with this gun!

          Reply
  7. Nice write up. Very straight forward and from your opinion but with facts, i liked it. I do have to disagree with one statement you made, if you can afford a 365 you probably won’t buy a G2c. I can afford pretty much anything under $1000 but I still bought the G2c because i thought it was a good gun and a good value. Oh and I sent in the $25 mail in rebate too, after I paid $179.

    Just picked mine up today and the big factors for me is the 12 +1 and how well it fit in my hand. So many of the compacts are so small that they don’t fit and I’m not comfortable shooting them. That is not the case with the G2c, fits like a glove.

    Reply
    • I’m into 30 years of conceal carry, and have had serval pistols on the way, carrying 1 our another for no lees the 3 years in between as to not lose practice and confidence of handling in between . Being said I’ve carry Glock 26, Smith&Wesson 6906, 5906, Ruger SR9c, Springfield 911 and Xd work tools for me invested in them, after all said got my hands on a Taurus G2c for my son first pistol, took to the range tested and fall in love all the rest lock in the safe G2c travels with me, reliable defense pistol with great recoil handling and simple good looking patterns that works on the hand. Value over high price brand buying just to say you have a $600 hundred pistol to brag about.

      Reply
      • Abraham, that’s quite an endorsement of the G2C. I’m glad yours works so well for you, after all the others you’ve used. Thanks for writing.

        Reply
  8. I took my G2C to the range this morning, I have to say this was an impressive shooter. I am especially happy with the fit, the texture on the grip is just enough, I especially enjoyed the manageability of the recoil. The trigger is not great but I wasn’t expecting an H&K trigger either. I no no issues with the pistol it did everything I needed it to and was very satisfied over all with the feel and quality. Great job on this one Taurus.

    Reply
    • Robert, I agree. Taurus has had its share of troubles but it looks like they got this one right. Thanks for your comment!

      Reply
  9. Hi Mike, I have a new one and just put 150 rounds through it today, No malfunctions, I love the trigger and the accuracy is very good. at around 10 yards I can make a nice ragged hole about two inches in diameter which is excellent for a defensive gun. My brother who is also a firearms instructor shot it and his Glock 43X . The accuracy on the Taurus was better for both of us. (I’m a firearms instructor as well.) This surprised us both. That and the G2C is approximately the same size as the Glock 43 with twice the rounds and a little smaller than the Glock 43x. She’s a keeper and I highly suggest people get one to carry.

    Reply
    • I agree…I have nothing against Glocks; it’s just that sometimes there’s another option out there that works just as well for less money. The 43X is a great gun, but a bit limited in capacity as you state. I think Taurus has a runaway hit on its hands with the G2C. For the single-stackers out there, there’s the G2S, a bit skinnier. Thanks for the post!

      Reply
    • James – agree totally. You could sure do worse the money spent. I think the G2C is going to be (if not already) a runaway hit for Taurus., something they really need. Thanks for writing!

      Reply
  10. I can afford a P365 and seriously considered one with the Thumb Safety which has just been released. I carry AIWB so thumb safety is mandatory for me. The G2C has a thumb safety, has 12 rd out cap out of the box, and is what I call a 1 1/2 stack which is more agreeable for me to grip. I put $100 of upgrades in the gun and still only have $300 in it. Trigger, oh well, time will tell if I can live with it.

    Reply
    • Richard, the trigger in my experience will loosen up a bit over time. My main problem with it wasn’t the weight of the pull, but the safety blade catching. I simply dry-fired it a bunch and that worked out. It DOES help to pull the trigger straight back, not off to one side – that guarantees a good trigger pull in my estimation. I would love to have a 365 but it’s not in cards right now – the Taurus makes a darn good substitute, especially at its price. Thanks for writing!

      Reply
  11. I am going for my first pistol. Was set on the sig p365 but the price tag is steep. Felt great when tested but your article, expertise, thoroughness and balanced presentation has me rethinking the impact on my wallet. Also, there is a nice sale at Dunham’s till 7/1/19. I think you’ve changed my mind. What kind of practice ammo do you recommend?

    Reply
    • Saif, there are so many different types of good ammo out there that I’d have a hard time recommending one specific brand. What you should look for is FMJ ammo that uses the same bullet weight, fired at about the same velocity, as your carry ammo. That will help insure that the bullet’s point of impact on the target is about where it would be with your carry ammo and that the recoil impulse is similar. This way, your practice ammo will be about as close to your carry ammo as you can get. There are even some brands of ammo, such as Winchester’s Train + Defend system that pairs a FMJ-bullet round with a JHP at the same weight and velocity, like I mentioned above. You could be pretty sure that if you shoot the training ammo well, the defend ammo should be fairly dialed in as well. As for a recommendation, well, I don’t generally like steel-cased ammo-sometimes it’s hard on the extractor – so whatever ammo you buy, you might want to stick with name-brand brass-cased stuff that is proven to be reliable and accurate. (This doubly true if you’re a reloader, in order to re-use the case). Just try to always finish your practice sessions with a mag or two of your chosen defense ammo, to keep your skill level and familiarity with it fresh. Thanks for the kind words and thanks for writing!

      Reply
  12. I picked up a G2c and put about 100 rounds of ammo through it last week, using my Shield as a comparison. The interesting thing to me is that even though the sights and trigger are not as good as on the Shield (seriously ,that trigger feels like there’s a rubber band in there somewhere-TWANG!) after the first couple of magazines for familiarization the Taurus shot close to even with the Shield and it definitely felt like I could improve even more than that with more practice.
    I most liked how handy the controls were- while still “low profile”, you could thumb the slide release or the safety without any problem. This is a big issue with smaller pistols, and I’ve run into a bunch of subcompacts where the slide release is basically there as decoration. The grip is big enough to be hand-filling and comfortable to shoot.
    The market niche Taurus is pushing for is a tight one (from Palmetto State Armory a non-2.0 Smith Shield is only going to be about $50 more than a G2C and has a much bigger aftermarket) and it’ll be interesting to see how their gamble with the G2c works out.

    Reply
    • Dave, good points. The G2C is positioned in the marketplace to obviously compete with the Shield, Glock 43, XDs and similar guns. Now we add the P365 into the mix. I agree with you about the trigger, but mine gets better with use. Taurus is really trying to get this pistol out, with rebates front and center, I think it is probably one of their best-sellers. Thanks for writing!

      Reply
  13. Thanks for your thorough and honest review of the G2C. Like others I was set to get either a Glock 42/43 or maybe the P365 but opted for the G2S based on yours and other reviews. Picked it up today at my local Bass Pro for $192 w/tax after the $25 rebate, not too shabby! Tho I haven’t shot her yet the pistol just feels good in hand and seems to be the best overall deal around for a budget carry gun. And I get to keep $200-$300 to save towards that sweet Sig P320 I looked at today too!

    Reply
    • Scott, I appreciate the kind words. I do try to go into more detail than other reviews I read. The G2C is a good buy – just be careful to clean it thoroughly (striker channel especially) before you shoot it. Mine has a sort-of-short throat, but has no trouble with factory loads. I just seat my handloaded bullets a few thousandths deeper. I mention these things so that if you run into them, you’ll be aware. They may have fixed the throating by now. And, you’re right – they are cheaper! You can buy 2.6 G2Cs for the price of one P365, at the prices I’ve seen around here. That’s a lot of extra ammo you can buy! Good luck, and keep saving for that 365 – that is a really nice gun, just a bit on the expensive side. Thanks for writing!

      Reply
  14. Great review & assessment! My experience with the G2C is similar, only lost patience with the trigger blade safety (tied it back). Given your review, an item I think that’s unique to my sample is the very short barrel throat – Hornady Critical Defense and a couple of my reloads won’t chamber. The protruding shank of the bullet engages the origin of the rifling. Am tempted to extend the throat a bit.

    Reply
    • Guth, I appreciate your kind words. As for the barrel throat issue, mine is short with my handloads – I use the Lee 124 grain round nose, but I think the radius sticks out a bit far for my G2C. I just seat it a bit deeper, no pressure issues. If you know how to extend the throat, you may try that, but be aware you may void your warranty. It would be interesting to chat online with a Taurus service rep and ask if we could just send the barrel by itself back for re-throating or replacement. A new one should drop in, no problem. I have heard of others who have short-throat issues. Your method of dealing with the trigger blade safety is a popular one, from what I see. I’m learning to pull the trigger straight back, not to the side, and my blade is slowly fixing itself. Even with these bobbles, the G2C is a heck of a buy. Thanks for writing!

      Reply
  15. Mike, you are a great writer and I really enjoyed reading your article. I also have had negative experiences twice before with Taurus customer service involving two other Taurus firearms in the past but I am willing to give them another chance. I just purchased a new Taurus G2C and I look forward to shooting it. Again, I enjoyed your article. Take care.

    Reply
    • Aaron, thanks for the compliment. I do try to go beyond what other reviewers do – you guys deserve all the info on a given gun that I can muster. I try to be honest – if there’s something I don’t like, I’ll say so. And, Taurus CS surprised me when I sent my Spectrum back for a spring I lost – no fault with the gun – it returned a month ahead of when they said it would. They are trying to improve things. Thanks for writing!

      Reply
  16. I’ve bought several more expensive guns looking for something better than my G2c. So far, I have not found it. It is the most comfortable in my hand, shoots well, is reliable and dependable. I have a Glock, M&P, S&W, Beretta, Ruger, BD, Sccy, and a few others. I always come back to my G2C. It just works…well.

    Reply
    • Jim, thanks for the comments. It’s reassuring to know that the little, inexpensive Taurus holds its own with the big-league more expensive guns. It is definitely a good buy. I think, my opinion only, that the G2C and the Spectrum are probably helping keep most of the bread on Taurus’s table right about now. I’ll bet they’re selling a ton of each. I just saw the Spectrum advertised locally for $120, with the G2C not far behind. Anyway, glad you like it. Do you have any plans to buy a Sig P365? That gun seems to be the one I see held up against the G2C a lot. Just curious. If you don’t mind, could you list some specific models of the brands you listed above that you own? I’m curious. (The SCCY makes one basic model – I had one). Thanks again!

      Reply
    • Paquito, thanks for writing and for the positive comments. I try to write my articles to be as detailed as I can get them in order to help with decision making, and will list both good and bad points as I see them. Glad it helped. I don’t think you’ll regret your decision to buy one.

      Reply
  17. Hey Mike, great article. I seek out your reviews when I’m looking at anything firearms related. I traded a kahr cm9 in for a G2c. I got $140 for the cm9, a free $22 1 hour range time coupon, a $25 rebate and the gun was on sale for $176. I love my G2c. 300+ rounds and no hiccups. I carry it in a clinger V3 stingray ambi kydex holster. I love the re-strike capability. It’s great for Indoor training with itargets laser bullets. After much reading I’ve discovered those who don’t understand striker fired firearms prefer DA/SA or de-cocker variants. They’re worried about the striker blocks potentially failing. Which is about a 1 in 1 billion chance. With the G2C the the DA or re-strike sear acts as an additional prevention to that happening. The DA sear would catch the slipped striker because the DA sear won’t move unless the trigger is pulled. This makes me believe it is the safest striker fired pistol to carry VS guns like a ppq and xds where the strikers are 100% pre tensioned.

    Reply
    • Dominic, great points! I hadn’t thought of the DA sear being a safety feature of sorts. I’m glad you like the G2C. The Kahr is a nice gun, too (I had one), but if you’re looking for greater capacity it sounds like you found the right gun. You might be on to something with what you said about the folks who don’t understand striker-fired guns. Clinger holsters are great, as well. Sounds like you have it figured out. I also appreciate your reading my reviews before buying – that makes it all worth it. Stay tuned for more reviews! Thanks for writing.

      Reply
  18. At first, I was sceptical about buying a Taurus, having owned an 85ch snubby… POS. Horrible trigger.
    After lots of online reading, I decided to start G2c shopping. Found one on sale, and happened to have a $75 gift card, so the gun cost me… $125! Love it. Also found 15 round extended mags. It’s my primary carry in anything but hot weather. Then my Colt Pony comes out.
    Nice to see Taurus get their stuff together!

    Reply
  19. Mike, a very informative and straight-forward review. Being new to handguns I’ve spent several months reading reviews and watching videos of a bunch of guns to educate myself. I’m very impressed with the G2C, the only issue I have is I’m a leftie and it’s not ambidextrous. I’d appreciate your comments on this.
    Thanks,
    George

    Reply
    • George, We southpaws have to learn to adapt to a right-handed shooting world. For example, I’ve just learned to click a 1911’s safety off with either my right thumb, 2-hand hold or my left one. The G2C’s mag release is reversible, which would help but you still have a port-side-only slide release. But, most folks who carry a G2C do not use the thumb safety or the slide release. Striker-fired guns are about as close to being ambidextrous as we lefties can hope for as some don’t have thumb safeties at all and the G2C’s fairly long, deliberate trigger pull counts as a sort of a built-in safety for some. Also, they “slingshot” the slide to get it back into battery, no release lever used. My main deal about being a lefty is holster selection – not a lot out there. Thanks for writing!

      Reply
  20. mike, i bought a g2c in od green about 6 months ago. i have around 500 rounds thru it to date. my son and a couple of friends could not believe how smooth and accurate it is. i have a 9mm mak pistol which i have carried, but did not own a gun chambered in 9mm luger. i love this pistol and i carry it daily. in my mind, i believe the g2c is the best cc deal on the market. compared to glock, s and w, and springfield, i feel it matches up quite well at a considerable savings. mike your article does the g2c the justice it deserves and your writing is brief, concise and to the point. well done.

    Reply
    • Beaubeau, first thanks for the compliment. I try to be helpful, and having been a shooter for over 40 I think I’ve learned a bit about it. As for the G2C being a good deal, I (obviously) agree. By the way – if you happen to be a handloader and load for both your Mak and the G2C, be careful not to mix up the brass. 9X18 and 9X19 look a LOT alike, trust me! Thanks for writing!

      Reply
  21. Mike, I wear t-shirts, only, 6 months of the year. It’s Vegas…nobody wears a hoodie or jacket May through Oct. I can’t find an AIWB, or any IWB holster that does not print with a t-shirt. The pic you showed certainly looks like a nice set up, but if you untucked that t-shirt, I’m pretty sure the gun would easily print. I have open-carried for years, but with so many businesses freaking out about open carry, I have to conceal often. Suggestions? BTW, I have an S&W M&P 9mmC, and will purchase a G2C if I can find the right holster.

    Reply
    • Jim, sounds like you have a problem. I do understand about warm-weather carry…where I live, summers can be brutal. Have you thought along the lines of either the belly-band type of holster or the ones that look like a large cell phone carrier attached to your belt? The belly-band would hold the gun very close and help prevent it printing, but it depends on your body type. If you are on the skinny side, it would work better. The other one is the “hidden-in-plain-sight” variety. The gun is there, but well-hidden.

      Check out the ones for the Taurus.

      Here’s one for a belly-band.

      Also, I don’t blame you for not open-carrying…I’m not much of a fan of that unless I’m hunting.
      If you wear long pants, there’s always ankle carry but I doubt you do when it’s hot. Keep us posted – thanks for writing!

      Reply
  22. Mike….recently purchased the G2C. In .40 cal. i LOVE IT. It is a fun gun to shoot and works flawlessly. Have had over 300 rounds through it of different grains and it takes them all. Love how it feels in the hand. Took a little while to get used to the trigger pull but once I got used to it, no problems. It is my favorite CCW. Won’t leave home without it. A great gun at a fantastic price.

    Reply
    • James, glad to have been of help for you. I do like mine – I don’t think you’ll be disappointed, and now with the new G3 out that makes a great addition to your collection. Thanks for writing!

      Reply
  23. Good review. I recommended this pistol for my grandson. Heck, i’d buy one if i hadn’t just got a 692 for a kit gun. I may still get one if i can get the wife to turn away for 3 seconds. One think you said about ammo was that you didnt test defensive ammo in this firearm. I recommend everyone to run defensive ammo through EACH of there magazines to test for function of the weapon. You can pay $2.00 a round for ammo but if it dont go bang, it has the value of a used toothpick…

    Reply
    • Jcromas, I agree. I’d run defensive ammo through my G2C several times before-I just was out when I wrote the review. Anything I put through, including my reloads, worked fine. Hopefully you can end up with one. Thanks for writing!

      Reply
  24. Enjoyed the article. I have a new G2c, one box of ammo thru it so far. Really like it. Want to put a laser on it, any suggestions?

    Reply
  25. I recently bought the G2C and I absolutely love the thing, adapting to the trigger wasn’t so bad, love the look and feel, I also purchased the .380 spectrum ?

    Reply
  26. Trigger … Yep it takes awhile to adjust to the trigger .. But…. Its short reset makes up for it … I think the trigger , even with its slight carch , is a good trigger …
    Guide rod?.. 1.5K rounds down the pipe .. Still works ..
    I have a around 35 semiauto pistols .. Most Glocks .. And I own two G2’s .. P365 …? No polymer framed Sigs for me … Definitely not the troubled P365 ..

    Reply
  27. To put it in perspective i own and occasionally carry a kimber 1911 so for the most part budget isnt a problem for me. I bought a G2C for an EDC and truck gun. Its simply a great gun and value.
    I have a friend who has the older pt111g2 version since 2014 and hes put over 3500rds through it of various types and never had a single failure. Its simply a great gun that works.
    The only problems i can think of with it is that the trigger while not terrible isnt my favorite and going back to my buddies pt111, he said the mags dont like hornady rounds with ballistic tips. Apparently they catch on the metal. That isnt an issue for me however as i prefer HST’s and Gold Dots.

    Reply
    • David, You have a great 1911… Kimber makes more 1911s than anyone else, at last check. It’s a great gun. I reviewed the Micro 9 elsewhere on this site and was impressed. The G2C is just a good, overall gun (especially for the price!). The trigger takes some getting used to but it isn’t too bad. Thanks for writing!

      Reply
  28. After reading many reviews and watching a number of YouTube videos on the Taurus® G2C, I decided to order one for myself. The low price and the $25.00 rebate also sold me!

    Long story short, my G2C is supposed to arrive on December 2, 2019. I can’t wait!

    Reply
  29. This was a great write-up. I bought the G2C during a Black Friday sale on a whim ($180) and have been pleasantly surprised by the reviews. Looking forward to shooting it!

    Reply
  30. I’m a bit late to the discussion but one reason I love my G2C is what the price means for ease of mind when NOT carrying. I’ve never had a gun stolen and hopefully (knock on wood) I never will but situations exist where I have to leave my gun in my truck (post office, court house etc…).

    I secure it properly but IF someone breaks in or steals my truck, I might get the truck back but odds say everything in it is gone. For sub-$200, it will will hurt a lot less to lose than one of my $500+ pistols.

    If you are one of those people that keeps a dedicated “truck gun”, this makes a really nice option for the same reason.

    As to the quality, it matches anything else I have shot-for-shot. Trigger isn’t amazing as you note but it’s functional. I personally am not a huge fan of the extent of the abrasive texture but for a few bucks on Amazon, some nice stickier-yet-smoother grip wraps are available that work really well.

    One thing I do like is it’s JUST small enough to pocket carry in a pocket holster with Wrangler shorts and pants (probably others too, I just know Wrangers are just deep enough, while some store brands aren’t). Is it the best way to carry? Nope. But I’d rather carry that way on some days vs. leaving the gun behind because I don’t want to deal with my IWB that day.

    I want a gun with options, and for a reliable, feature-rich compact under $200, this ticked a lot of boxes for me and continues to be my primary EDC gun.

    Reply
    • Stephen, good points. I too would rather have to replace a $200 gun over a $500 one. Also, good point on Wrangler pants…we should take note of that. As to the grip, a big of 400-grit sandpaper lightly passed over the stippling should take care of that. I like a rough texture, but not all do. Thanks for writing!

      Reply
  31. Great review and write-up! I’m an HK guy, have several and they are as most know… pricey to say the least, outstanding examples of engineering and quality. I thought I’d take a chance on this little guy because of the price point, glad I did. It’s well made, although there are a few items which can be improved; replacing the plastic striker guide, the recoil assembly, and the trigger (all three for less than $100). Other than that, the unit runs just fine, no fails. Obviously not an HK, but nothing else is either 🙂
    This is a nice little shooter for sure!

    Reply
    • DAK, I agree – it’s not an HK but it sure is one reliable gun, and available at a great price. As for HK, I just reviewed the P2000SK – look for that one soon. Thanks for writing!

      Reply
  32. Mike, Agree. Your article is spot on. Love this gun so much, I bought 2 of them. Excellent value for the money. 100% reliable on both so far with about 500 rounds of Remington jhp 100 round value pack run thru each one. I practice with what i carry in them. I put it in a clinger stingray holster. Super comfortable. At this price point, if a scratch shows up, it’s not as big of a deal as I am fussy on keeping my stuff in top condition. Why spend more than you need to when you can put the savings into ammo for extra range time.

    Reply
    • Brent, good points. I’m glad you like it (them?). I owned 2 PT111 G2s before the G2C came out – that makes 3 for me. I see what you’re saying. Thanks for writing!

      Reply
  33. I’ve owned more than a few of these. I used them as loaner weapons in my handgun permit classes. On my personal G2, I opted to install the single action only trigger (I don’t care about restrike.) made a huge difference in the overall performance of the weapon for me personally.
    Without a doubt, best bang for the buck.

    Reply
  34. Would this gun be good for me having an autoimmune disease that affects the tendons in my wrist? I’m looking for a gun for personal protection since my husband works 3rd shift and I’m alone 5-6 nights a week.

    Reply
    • Shari, do you have trouble racking the slide? If so, I just handled a new gun that might work for you. Smith and Wesson makes their Shield .380 EZ now in 9mm – you get 2 8-round magazines, a very-easy-to-rack slide with rear “wings” to grab, and both magazines have easy-load pull-down levers. If hand strength is an issue, you might check this out. Of course, revolvers don’t have a slide to rack – have you thought about one of those? I would recommend a wheel gun capable of firing the .38 Special +P round – most can do that – or a .357 magnum. (Or, if you’re recoil-conscious, even a .22 revolver might work). Let me know if you need more info and we’ll go from there. Thanks for writing!

      Reply
  35. Just got me one today I’m really looking forward to shooting this little gun. To tell you my step dad was the one who convinced me this gun was a good buy. His was the first Glock I ever shot and I own on of those now. He was in law enforcement for many years. He bought a G2c for my mom because he travels for work now and wanted her to have the extra little safety at home when he’s gone. If it’s good enough for a ex sheriffs wife I think it will be good enough for me.

    Reply
  36. One extra feature that I like about the Taurus G2c is that you can increase the 12+1 rounds to 20+1 rounds by using a MEC-GAR MGP22620AFC magazine. (Manufactured for the Sig Sauer P226 9mm Luger) This magazine is a 20 Round with a Steel Blued Finish and has an Anti-Friction Coating. It works every bit as well as the the OEM Taurus 12 round magazine and ‘fill-in’ sleeves can be purchased from several different sellers on eBay. It makes me love my Taurus G2c even more!

    Reply
  37. Hello, I am a new gun owner and realizing there is good ammunition and bad ammunition. What ammunition do you recommend? Thank you and great article.

    Reply
    • Dee, in this time of uncertainty, ammo seems to be flying off shelves. However, there are still supplies out there. For your G2C (I assume that’s what you have), almost any factory full-metal jacket (FMJ) ammo would work for practice, and any of the major-brand defensive ammo should be fine for carry – Hornady, Federal, Winchester, Double Tap, Speer, Underwood etc. It depends upon what you can find. Two thoughts…I’d avoid steel-case ammo (I’ve not had much luck with steel-case and extraction), and handloading. With a minimal investment, you can be making your own ammo that will provide at least the number of practice rounds you want, shooting cast bullets or JHPs bought in bulk.
      If you have any more questions, please let me know here and I’ll try to help more. Good luck, and stay safe! Thanks for writing!

      Reply
  38. Mike, this was a great review. I received my G2C from Taurus (after a very long wait) after I participated in the “turn-in” program after sending them my “old” PT-145 Gen1. At first, I hated that I turned in my .45 and got back this 9mm! I thought that they might have a fix for it or something. But I took my new G2C and after the first 6 boxes through it, without any malfunctions I was impressed. I even put 3 boxes of Hornady Critical Defense through it and it loved it! It will shoot anything. Now, after 3 years and about 1,100 rounds its still good. THANK YOU for telling us about Lakeline, LLC!!!! Unless your as into Taurus as I am, you have no idea how hard it is to find aftermarket accessories for Taurus Semi- automatic handguns! Going to be hitting them up after this Corona thing blows over.

    Reply
  39. Great write up. Think I am going to buy the Taurus G2C. Can’t seem to find a great deal on it like others mentioned . Cheapest is $229.99. On sale at a local store. Opinions anyone know of deals or should I wait? Thank you

    Reply
    • Randy, that’s not a bad price for the G2C. Unless you have a reason to wait, you might just go ahead and pick it up. We are living through some …different… times (not the original word I thought of), you might just go ahead with it. Never know what’s around the corner. Thanks for writing!

      Reply

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